Tag Archives: ROC-CENTRAL

Serving While Sick - High Risks & Low Benefits for the Nation's Restaurant Featured Image

Serving While Sick

In 2010 ROC United released Serving While Sick, a national study on health and safety conditions in the restaurant industry.  The report was based on 4,323 worker surveys on general working conditions, 240 employer interviews, 240 worker interviews, 500 worker surveys specifically on health insurance needs, and 20 employer interviews on health insurance needs.  The findings showed the effects of high risks of injury and illness and low access to benefits for America’s restaurant workforce.  They demonstrated the need for mandatory paid sick days laws to alleviate the burdens of restaurant workers and the risk of communicable diseases to the public, as well as the need for access to healthcare for restaurant workers.

Our Findings

  • 87.7% of restaurant workers surveyed reported not having paid sick days.
  • 63% of restaurant workers reported cooking and serving food while sick.
  •  Almost 90% of restaurant workers reported not having health insurance through their employer.  Those without insurance were three times as likely to visit the emergency room without being able to pay.
  • A majority of workers surveyed reported facing high rates of exposure to dangerous working conditions: 38.1% reported doing something while working to put their own safety at risk, 49.5% had been cut on the job, and 45.8% had been burned on the job.
  • Workers that faced employment law violations in the workplace were much more likely to work under conditions that have negative consumer impacts.

Download the Executive Summary here.

Download the full report here.

Burned - High Risks and Low Benefits for Workers in the NYC Restaurant Industry Featured Image

Burned: High Risks and Low Benefits for Workers in the New York City Restaurant Industry

In 2009 ROC-NY released Burned: High Risks and Low Benefits for Workers in the New  York City Restaurant Industry, an in-depth study of occupational safety and health and access to benefits in the New York City restaurant industry.  The research included analysis of 502 restaurant worker surveys, 10 worker focus groups, and 35 employer interviews.

Our Findings

  • ● 82% of workers surveyed reported being required to do a job that makes them feel they might be at risk of injury.
  • ● Workers that have no access to healthcare benefits are more likely to engage in dangerous consumer health practices.  65% of all workers who engaged in any dangerous consumer health practice had no access to benefits, compared to 52% of the entire set of respondents who had no access to any benefits.
  • ● 63% of restaurant workers reported having stiffness, pain, tightness, aching, or soreness in their legs, knees, and feet.
  • ● 36% of workers surveyed have been cut on the job.
  • ● 27% of workers surveyed have been burned on the job.
Download full report here

Full Report [scribd id=65092837 key=key-2ky5ky07juk3evgja8sv mode=list]
The Great Service Divide - Occupational Segregation & Inequality in the NYC Restaurant Industry Featured Image

The Great Service Divide NEW YORK

In 2009 ROC-NY released The Great Service Divide, an in depth study of occupational segregation and discrimination on the basis of race and gender in the New York fine dining restaurant industry.  The research included 138 matched pair audit tests, in which whites and people of color applied to the same server positions in New York fine dining restaurants. The tester pairs were matched in every respect except for race and ethnicity. The research also included demographic canvassing of the race/ethnicity makeup of front-of-the-house restaurant positions in 45 fine dining restaurants; analysis of 530 surveys; 40 worker interviews and 40 employer interviews and 40 worker interviews; and census data analysis of the relationship between wages, race/ethnicity, gender, and nativity.

Our Findings

  • White applicants were almost twice as likely to get a job offer despite being given slightly lesser qualifications.
  • White male workers hold the vast majority of livable-wage front of the house positions, such as servers and bartenders, while workers of color hold the vast majority of lower-paid front of the house positions, such as bussers and runners.
  • Workers of color earn 11.6% less than white workers, female workers earn 21.8% less than male workers, and immigrant workers make 9.7% less than non-immigrant workers, even accounting for differences in education, experience, and English ability.

Download the full report here.