Kansas Labor Laws

Kansas’ state minimum wage rate is $7.25 per hour

The current minimum wage for tipped employees is $2.13.

In calculating the overtime rate for the tipped employee, the restaurateur must multiply the minimum wage ($7.25 per hour) by 1½ (1.5), subtract the tip credit ($5.12 per hour), multiply that figure by the number of overtime hours worked, and then add that sum to their 40-hour total. 

Kansas does not require employers to provide meal or rest breaks.

If an employer pays a processing fee to accept credit cards from customers (for example, 3% of the total bill charged to the credit card), and that customer leaves a tip as part of the credit card payment, the employer is allowed to deduct the employee’s share of the credit card processing charge (for example, 3% of the bill charged to the card) the employee realizes in Kansas. This is the case because Kansas law does not prohibit employers from doing this.

Employers are not required to provide paid or unpaid sick leave but must comply with their own established policies  in their employee handbook if they choose to implement one.

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At Cornerstone Law Firm, we understand that the justice system can be intimidating. Our award-winning attorneys are here to explain the legal process and fight for the rights of each and every one of our clients.

Working hard to support yourself and your family is one of the basic building blocks that makes this country great, and laws have been created to protect your right to earn a living free from discrimination, harassment, and retaliation. However, more often than not, individuals are unaware of their rights, and employers take advantage of this unawareness, oftentimes to the detriment to the employees’ home life and personal wellbeing.

Do you know your rights as an employee? Have you been sexually harassed, wrongfully terminated, or retaliated against by your employer for trying to protect your rights? If you believe that your rights may have been violated, call us today for a free consultation with one of our employee rights attorneys.