New Jersey Labor Laws

New Jersey’s state minimum wage rate is $11.00 per hour

Employers who elect to take the tip credit will be required to pay their tipped employees a cash wage of at least $3.13 per hour.

In calculating the overtime rate for the tipped employee, the restaurateur must multiply the minimum wage ($11.00 per hour) by 1½ (1.5), subtract the tip credit ($7.87 per hour), multiply that figure by the number of overtime hours worked, and then add that sum to their 40-hour total. 

While employers typically provide lunch and meal breaks in New Jersey, there is no legal requirement for most employers to provide any breaks

Yes, employers are legally allowed to do this. When a tip is placed on a credit card, the Fair Labor Standards Act lets an employer deduct credit card processing fees from the tip, as long as that does not pull the employee’s wages below the minimum wage and the tip is paid by the regular payday.

The New Jersey Earned Sick Leave Law allows employees to accrue 1 hour of earned sick leave for every 30 hours worked, up to 40 hours each year. The law permits employers to create policies that provide additional leave time.

Employment Law Firms

Karpf, Karpf & Cerutti, P.C.

4.9/5

In these tough economic times, it may seem that your employer has all the power. You may think that you have few, if any, rights against the actions of your employer. But this is simply not true. Federal, state, and local laws protect workers and regulate various aspects of the employer-employee relationship. Our employment attorneys in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York can advise you how these various laws apply to your situation.

National Legal Advocacy Network

4.7/5

The National Legal Advocacy Network is a legal non-profit organization that believes in shifting the balance of power towards greater equity through organizing, empowering systematically marginalized people and challenging entrenched racial discrimination, sexual harassment and exploitative workplace practices and predatory business schemes. NLAN is dedicated to leveraging legal resources to enhance the capacity and sustainability of the low-wage worker movement through community focused lawyering, worker center support and strategic litigation.​